Saturday, February 09, 2008

Scans again.

I meant to do a post about evergreen conifers for winter color but I haven't been able to take photos of the shrubs and trees so I'm posting scans I took last year. I was enamored of the process - using the scanner to capture pictures of plants and the ability to take very detailed and sharp pictures always intrigued me. The plants do look like specimens in some kind of display and many people thought it looked rather cold but I like the detail the process affords - so much more than 100% crops of a picture taken by a camera.

Please click on the image to enlarge.








I think this is some sort of milkweed I found in a development tract. A rather insignificant weed but interesting when enlarged. The white specks are pollen dusted off the flowers.

2 Comments:

Blogger kate said...

Ki,

The scan of these flowers doesn't look cold at all! I like the detail. Besides the colour scans really well.

One of these days, you'll be able to get photos of the evergreens. That'll be interesting to read.

7:44 PM  
Blogger Ki said...

Hello Kate,

'Tho we had an abundance of sunshine today, the temperature just managed to approach the mid twenties F. but the wind was fierce. I know, I know, I sound like a wuss when you are experiencing Canadian winters on the plains with sub zero arctic fronts constantly battering your home. But this is cold for us. This is leading up to my reason for not taking pictures of the conifers I've been promising. One day soon...

I too like the extremely detailed picture the scanner is able to capture. Also everything in the scanner image is in focus. Unlike a camera, it doesn't seem to have problems with depth of field, some parts of the photo in focus, usually the subject and the background out of focus. The scanner just seems to run out of light and fades away rather than blurring. Maybe that's why a lot of people find it analytical and cold. The camera sees things more like our own eyes - only a small spot is in focus. We are fooled into thinking everything is in focus because whatever we look at is where the sharpest focus of our eye happens to be. Our peripheral vision is blurred and out of focus.

7:13 PM  

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